© 2019  Fishers Guitar/Marketing Services/In-Home Music Lessons

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correct pricing errors and /or typos that may inadvertently occur. For more information please see: Policies.

  FAQs 

We trust that the following FAQs are helpful. Send us your questions about music lessons, instruments, etc., and we will publish all that we can. Please submit to this link: info@fishersguitar.com

 

Question:
I want to buy my son a guitar for his birthday and I wanted to know is a guitar from a chain department store Is OK?


Answer:
Chain stores that carry everything from to frozen chicken to automobile tires sometimes are not the best pick for a serious instrument purchase. The sales people aren’t really trained to answer musical instrument questions not to mention what do you do when a string breaks or the guitar neck needs adjusting due to our ever-changing Indiana weather. There are a lot of high priced toys masquerading, as guitars, drums and electronic keyboards out there - be careful. Buy from a reputable music dealer where you can speak face to face with someone who knows musical instruments and will stand behind your purchase with a substantial warranty. 

 

Question:
Our 8-year old wants to start guitar lessons. Is 8 too young to start an instrument?
He is crazy about Guitar Hero.


Answer:
Eight is a good age to start. We start students as early as five; a lot depends on attitude and desire. Guitar Hero and Rock Band have spurned a renewed interest in playing guitar. This isn't a bad thing. If your child has an interest in making real music then the guitar is the way to go. He/she can make music in a relatively short amount of time with no real investment (as opposed to renting or buying a piano to "see how it goes”. The idea is to keep him interested because making music is a talent one can use for a lifetime. 

 

Question:
How much should I expect to spend on a starter guitar for our 12-year-old daughter?


Answer: A good, full sized starter guitar runs between $130 – $250. An instrument in this price range will give your daughter an opportunity to learn on an instrument that is easy to fret and has a pleasing tone. Or, rent an instrument for a period of time if you are uncertain of her commitment.

Question:
Can we take lessons from you and not buy a guitar, but rent one?


Answer:
We go one better. Why pay for a rental that someone else has already used when you can have a FREE guitar (at no extra charge) when you purchase a lesson/guitar package from us. Simply commit to 12 weeks of lessons and a free, student model guitar, is yours.

Question:
If my child misses a lesson due to illness, how is that handled?


Answer:
If your child is ill and must miss a lesson, we will make up the lesson as soon as possible. Missed lessons cannot be deducted from the lesson fee the next month.  It is required that you notify us 24 hours in advance of the illness. If an illness is same day, please notify by noon if possible. All kids get sick. 

 

Question:

My daughter wants to start guitar lessons. She is 11 years old and is quite small for her age. Are there guitars for smaller kids?


Answer:

For children and small-framed, we carry 1/2 and 3/4 sized acoustic and electric guitars. 
 

Question:
Is it better to start a child off on an acoustic or electric guitar?


Answer:
Acoustic guitars are portable and always ready to play without amplification. They are generally welcome at Grandma’s house and can be played outdoors, i.e., campfires, backyard, vacation, etc. Electrics, on the other hand, are a bit easier to play because they fret easier but they do require an amplifier. Grandma may not take so kindly to Smoke On The Water turned up to 11. If you choose electric, make sure the amp has a headphone jack… it’s a lifesaver at times. An acoustic guitar makes playing an electric much easier. Not usually the other way around. And if you are not confused enough by now, there are electric acoustic electric models – the best of both worlds. Generally, my experience has been that for beginners, an acoustical guitar is the better way to go.

Question:
I am an adult male with large, short fingers. I played guitar when I was a kid and I want to take it up again for fun but no guitar seems to fit my hand - any suggestions?


Answer:
Most guitar nuts, the piece of bone-like material the strings pass over to make their trip down the neck to the bridge, are 1 3/4”.  A wider nut, for instance 1 7/8", will space strings a bit wider and make it easier for large fingered players. Most players will say that it really doesn’t make much difference though; just learn to chord correctly and there is no problem. I played professionally for nearly 20 years and now, I can hardly play my old Gibson. I can, however, play my classical guitar that used to be a pain to play! My advice is to try a decent classical guitar. The sound is refreshing and sweet. If you want a heavier sound, just use a pick - go ahead, it never stopped Willie Nelson.

Question:
How long should a beginner practice, my two sons have started lessons but their teacher was vague about practice. “Just as long as they practice sometime” he always says.


Answer:
Your teacher is somewhat right, but “sometime” should be replaced with “everyday”. Young players, between 7 and 11 should practice about five minutes every day, seven days a week. They should practice slowly and quietly. This seems to help reinforce the learning. What young players should not do is cram the night before their lesson; sore fingers will get the best of them. Shorter practice time not only allows the tender fingers of your future Eric Clapton to toughen naturally, but real achievement can be seen with these short but thorough sessions. After a few months, add a few minutes to the session until they are practicing about a half hour a day. Then, they have made it to the tipping point because they have stayed engaged.